10 Weird Facts Proving Your Body Is a Mysterious System | Viral Buzz News
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10 Weird Facts Proving Your Body Is a Mysterious System

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The human body is unique. It’s a very complicated mechanism which still has a lot of secrets scientists have been researching for centuries. But why don’t we try to figure out what the capabilities of our body are, and how far they can stretch?

Bright Side would like to tell you about a few amazing things our bodies are capable of.

1. Your brain is the largest flash drive in the world.

The memory of your brain has enough capacity to store 2.5 million GB of information. This is approximately 300 years of video. The peak of memory development occurs at 25 years old and it begins to decrease at the age of 50 unless you train your memory.

2. Your body can slow down its processes to protect you from drowning.

This effect is called the diving reflex. When your brain realizes that your body is immersed in water, it slows your heart rate redirecting blood from your limbs to the vital organs to conserve oxygen. The deeper you’re diving or staying under water the slower your heart rate is.

3. You were super strong when you were a baby.

Newborn babies are very strong for their size and weight. If a baby grasps a horizontal bar, it can hang there for a long time without getting tired. This palmar grasp reflex is inherited from our ancestors from when newborn monkeys had to hold on their mothers, grasping their hair. At the age of 3 months, babies usually lose this ability.

4. The length of all blood vessels inside our body is enough to encircle the Earth 2.5 times around the equator.

If you took all the blood vessels out of an average adult and laid them out in one line, the line would stretch over 100,000 miles. This is enough to encircle the Earth 2.5 times. Our heart, at the same time, pumps 5.7 million liters of blood on average during our entire life. This volume is enough to fill 3 Olympic-size swimming pools.

5. Men’s breasts can produce milk.

All humans, regardless of gender, have milk glands, milk ducts, and nipples. Men’s nipples can be stimulated to produce milk. This can also happen due to a hormonal imbalance caused by severe stress.

6. The color of your dreams can depend on the type of television you watch.

The type of television you used to watch when you were a child can affect the color of your dreams. This study showed that the majority of people who were brought up watching a monochrome television set see dreams in black and white. While people who were born after color television was invented have colorful dreams.

7. Your muscles are designed to lift tons.

In 1982, in Lawrenceville, Angela Cavallo lifted a 1964 Chevrolet Impala. The car fell off the jacks that held it up while her son Tony was working underneath it and it pinned him down. Mrs. Cavallo lifted the car high enough and long enough for 2 neighbors to replace the jacks and pull Tony from beneath the car.

This is not the only case where someone has done the seemingly impossible during an adrenaline rush. We have 640 muscles inside our body, the limits of which are unknown.

8. Your body is a machine of mucus production.

An adult body produces 1.5 liters of snot a day, on average. We swallow most of it without even paying attention to it. In addition, a body also produces one liter of saliva, 3 liters of stomach juice, 3.5 liters of intestinal juice, and one liter of bile.

9. The liquid that runs out of your nose can be from your brain.

The liquid leaking through your nose can be your brain fluid. Brain fluid is located around your brain and held in by a special membrane. Sometimes it can leak through your nose in small quantities as a clear liquid.

10. Your body is the most protected construction in the world.

In this picture, you can see a white blood cell chasing a bacteria, overtaking it, and devouring it. These cells are the “men in black” of our body that protect it from “evil invaders.” At the same time, our body also removes old and littered cells. For example, while you were reading this sentence 22 million of your cells died. In the following 30 seconds, your body will produce 72 million new red blood cells and will get rid of 174 thousand old skin cells.

Which one of your body superpowers impressed you the most? Tell us in the comments below.

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Look at How Much “Game of Thrones” Characters Have Changed Over 8 Seasons

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During the summer of 2019, the final season of Game of Thrones aired. The show had gone on for almost 10 years which is a long time not only for the characters but also for the actors who portrayed them.

Bright Side is remembering what characters looked like in the very first episodes of the groundbreaking series and is comparing them to what they look like in the final season of the show.

1. Cersei Lannister

2. Jon Snow

3. Tyrion Lannister

4. Daenerys Targaryen

5. Sansa Stark

6. Arya Stark

7. Jorah Mormont

8. Varys

9. Jaime Lannister

10. Sandor Clegane

11. Brienne of Tarth

12. Samwell Tarly

13. Davos Seaworth

14. Theon Greyjoy

15. Brandon Stark

Did you watch Game of Thrones? Did you enjoy season 8? Tell us in the comment section below.

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Baltimore’s ransomware attack, explained – Vox

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Thirteen bitcoins are standing between the city of Baltimore and many of the services and processes its citizens rely on after hackers seized thousands of government computers at the start of the month. The ordeal has been going on for two weeks, and there’s no clear end in sight.

Here’s what’s happening: On May 7, hackers digitally seized about 10,000 Baltimore government computers and demanded around $100,000 worth in bitcoins to free them back up. It’s a so-called “ransomware” attack, where hackers deploy malicious software to block access to or take over a computer system until the owner of that system pays a ransom.

Baltimore, like several other cities that have been hit by such attacks over the past two years, is refusing to pay up. As a result, for two weeks, city employees have been locked out of their email accounts and citizens have been unable to access essential services, including websites where they pay their water bills, property taxes, and parking tickets. This is Baltimore’s second ransomware attack in about 15 months: Last year, a separate attack shut down the city’s 911 system for about a day. Baltimore has come under scrutiny for its handling of both attacks.

The ransomware attacks in Baltimore and other local governments across the US demonstrate that as ransomware attacks spread, and as common targets such as hospitals and schools beef up their online systems’ security, there are still plenty targets vulnerable to this kind of hack. It also exemplifies the conundrum that ransomware victims face: pay up and get your access back, or refuse — potentially costing much more in the long run.

What’s going on in Baltimore, briefly explained

Hackers targeted the city of Baltimore on May 7 using a ransomware called RobbinHood, which, as NPR explains, makes it impossible to access a server without a digital key that only the hackers have.

The Baltimore hackers’ ransom note, obtained by the Baltimore Sun, demanded payment of three bitcoins per system to be unlocked, which amounts to 13 bitcoins to unlock all the seized systems. The note threatened to increase the ransom if it wasn’t paid in four days, and said the information would be lost forever if it wasn’t paid in 10 days. Both deadlines have now passed.

“We won’t talk more, all we know is MONEY! Hurry up! Tik Tak, Tik Tak, Tik Tak!” the note said.

The city government is refusing to pay, meaning that the government email systems and payment platforms the attack took down remain offline. The attack has also harmed Baltimore’s property market, because officials weren’t able to access systems needed to complete real estate sales. (The city said transactions resumed on Monday.)

Baltimore Mayor Jack Young, who’s officially been in his office less than a month, said in a statement on Friday that city officials are “well into the restorative process” and have “engaged leading industry cybersecurity experts who are on-site 24-7 working with us.” The FBI is also involved in the investigation.

“Some of the restoration efforts also require that we rebuild certain systems to make sure that when we restore business functions, we are doing so in a secure manner,” Young said. He did not offer a timeline for when all systems will come back online.

The Baltimore City Council president also plans to form a special committee to investigate this latest attack and try to ensure it doesn’t happen again.

A similar attack using RobbinHood hit government computers in Greenville, North Carolina, in April. A spokesperson for Greenville told the Wall Street Journal that the city never wound up paying, and that while its systems aren’t entirely restored, “all of our major technology needs are now being met.”

More than 20 municipalities in the US have been hit by cyberattacks this year alone. And such attacks can be expensive, perhaps especially if targets say they won’t pay. In 2018, hackers demanded that Atlanta pay about $50,000 in bitcoins as part of a ransomware attack. The city refused, and according to a report obtained by the Atlanta Journal-Constitution and Channel 2 Action News, the attack wound up costing the city $17 million to fix.

Ransomware attacks aren’t new — but we’re still figuring out how to deal with them

In 2017, a ransomware called WannaCry targeted tens of thousands of computers using Microsoft Windows operating systems in more than 100 countries. Officials in the US and the United Kingdom eventually blamed North Korea for the attack. Also in 2017, corporations in the UK, France, Russia, Israel, and Ukraine experienced ransomware attacks. US hospitals were also targeted.

Here’s how Timothy Lee explained for Vox what was going on and how ransomware had become more prolific:

The basic idea behind ransomware is simple: A criminal hacks into your computer, scrambles your files with unbreakable encryption, and then demands that you pay for the encryption key needed to unscramble the files. If you have important files on your computer, you might be willing to pay a lot to avoid losing them.

Ransomware schemes have become a lot more effective since the invention of Bitcoin in 2009. Conventional payment networks like Visa and Mastercard make it difficult to accept payments without revealing your identity. Bitcoin makes that a lot easier. So the past four years have seen a surge in ransomware schemes striking unsuspecting PC users.

Some ransomware schemes are so sophisticated that they even invest in customer service, helping victims who want to pay their ransoms navigate the complexities of obtaining bitcoins and making bitcoin payments.

Since then, a number of sectors and organizations have made improvements to their security practices to protect against ransomware. But the latest Baltimore attack exemplifies what a whack-a-mole game this is: One area improves its practices and hackers just go looking for another.


Recode and Vox have joined forces to uncover and explain how our digital world is changing — and changing us. Subscribe to Recode podcasts to hear Kara Swisher and Peter Kafka lead the tough conversations the technology industry needs today.

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Cameron Russell for ELLE

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A film by Kai Z Feng of our February 2014 cover.

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